Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Hardcore Splatterpunk Genius Edward Lee Interview

     As many of you don't know I am a huge fan of the next interviewee, I started reading him around the year 2008 probably and have never looked back.  I have read and collected quite a fair share of his books, from anywhere I could find them.  Buying the new releases as they come out.  He is a King of Hardcore writing.  If it's sex, blood, or quite simply the most disgusting thing you can dream up, he writes about.  And also has movies that are the epitome of his writing, out there and graphic.  Upon directing his own and others have taken their shots also, I have collected those too.  His novels have been released mainstream and independent publisher's, like Necro Publications has a great collection of his novels.  He is simply my hero in writing, Edward Lee.  He is simply the best writer in quality graphic fiction, from aliens, to hideous monsters, to what could be real life people, he has wrote it all.  On top of all that he wrote about the Cold War, and Dahmer.  He has also collaborated with some of the best in horror writing today.  I actually got to interview The Man, The Great Edward Lee.

     1:  What made you become a writer?

     EL  1:  Impossible to pinpoint but I do recall walking guard duty in a 1st Armored Division tank park one night, in Germany, 1978.  Very creepy night, dead silent save for my boots crunching the gravel.  Around that time, I’d read Lovecraft’s “Rats in the Wall” and a copy of Heavy Metal magazine, and the imagery of both of these works made my eyes bloom as I walked my post, and I thought, “Damn, it would be so cool to be a writer!”

     S:  I never thought of that movies always hit me that way, but I would love to write my own novel someday.

     2:  After your first novel, under pen name Richard Kinion, how did the decision arise to be more graphic and sexual?

     EL  2:  My first pen name was Philip Straker, which I used for my first two novels in 1982: Night Bait and Nightlust.  These books aren’t very good but they were essential because they got my foot in the publishing door.  Richard Kinion came in the 90s after there had already been 6 Edward Lee novels.  The publisher insisted I use a pen name because the midlist horror market crashed, but I still had a book under contract.  They got the idea to use a non-horror pen name, and make that last book like a “suspense” novel.  Still can’t quite figure it, because the book, renamed SACRIFICE, was very much gothic-erotic horror, a haunted house story!
     S:  Damn but me to shame, but I found a Philip Straker novel, Night Bait, in my Ed Lee collection, I must've been confused on dates of publishing, thanks for clearing that up.

     3.  In your life was there an influential person who turned you towards horror?

     EL  3:  Foremost, H.P. Lovecraft.  Also, in the 70s I’d begun reading what horror was available beyond Stephen King–mainly the late Charles L. Grant, the late Brian McNauhgton, and Ramsey Campbell (a HUGE influence) and it occurred to me, “If I’m gonna write, it’s GOT to be horror.  Why should these guys have all the fun!”  Now, if you meant a person I’d actually met, no–er, at least I wouldn’t meet him till decades later.  That would be Dick Dyszel aka Count Gore De Vol, the late-night horror movie host on Channel 20 in the Washington D.C. area.  I started watching him in the late 60s, through most of the 70s, and into early 80s.  In the 60s I’d have to sneak out of bed at night to watch him.  The schlock horror movies he showed were all magnificent, and they all had a striking impact on my young brain.  I would describe the Count’s influence on me as career-shaping; he planted seeds that would, years later, sprout as Edward Lee.  I finally met him in the early 2000s, and let him know the paramount impact he had on me.  I fact, I saw him a few months ago at Scares That Care.  What a great guy!  And he still looks the same.  He IS the Count!  Man, those were the good ole days...

     S:  Lovecraft was my first foray into horror novels, with his imagery and imagination, he astounded my mind, I read King but it didn't have much effect on me books were too long for a attention span of a teen.

     4:  When did you feel that writing was your ultimate calling?

     EL  4:  Now that I CAN pinpoint.  It was 1980.  I was in college to be an English teacher, and I was sitting in a class called “History of the English Language.” Suddenly I stiffened in my seat, stared ahead, closed my school book, got up, nodded to the teacher, and walked out of the classroom and off the campus.  That was the moment when I was struck by the Writer Lightning Bolt.  (I regret not finishing the class, though, because it was fascinating.  We learned where the word “fuck” came from and, no, it never meant For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge or Fornication Under the Court of the King.  It’s from an Old English transitive verb FOK, which meant to strike and/or to penetrate.)

     S:  Wow, the feeling must've been overwhelming to up and leave, I will keep FOK in my vocabulary now.

     5:  Around what age do you remember writing your first story for yourself?

      E: I was in junior high in Sligo Creek, Maryland, and we were supposed to write a short story based on a song we liked–kind of a dumb exercise.  I wrote “After Forever,” based on a Black Sabbath song about spaceships looking for other planets to live on because we’d ecologically trashed earth.  But, lo, my story wasn’t about spaceships, it was about a submarine and World War III.  Go figure.  I think I still have it.  But it might suggest that even then I must’ve been marching to the beat of a different drummer: 12 or 13 years old listening to Black Sabbath!

     S:  That's classic listening to Black Sabbath at 12 or 13, but where ever we find inspiration we should run with it.

     6:  Did you have any college or formal training in writing literature?

     EL: Formal training, no.  I don’t believe in Writing Classes much.  Fiction writing is subjective; you can’t teach what isn’t concrete.  But I did go to college, University of Maryland, and got a great background in literature.  That’s VERY important for wannabe writers.

     S:  I didn't have any inspiration to write other than books and film, and now I feel I'm to old to go to college for a writing class, trial and error is what I'm trying.
 
     7:  Do you prefer writing short stories, novellas, or full length novels?


     EL: Novellas! (Or is it Novellae?)   The perfect length seems to be anything between an 80,000 word novel and a 5000 word story.  Restricting or expanding your story to fit length guidelines isn’t very creative, but in the pre-digital age it was mandatory.  Now, not so, thanks to Kindle!

     S:  That's excellent advise, why restrict yourself but guidelines are good.


     8:  What novel/short you wrote do you feel represents your best/favorite work?


      EL: I’ve often thought of my favorite novel as Infernal Angel but I don’t know.  I really like my story “The Ushers,” but I also really like my latest novel White Trash Gothic, but that’s not really a novel, it’s the first part of a series which I suppose will be my magnum opus.  Hell, I like all of them, even the turds!

     S:  Infernal Angel is my favorite, I advise everybody to start there if interested in reading your stuff.  White Trash Gothic I received a couple of days ago can't wait to get started.


     9:  What novel/short do you feel was the hardest to write?


     EL: Dunwich Romance, not because of the complexity of imitating Lovecraft’s style, because I was off and on caring for my mother who’d become invalidized and was slowly dying.  Such is life (and God rest her soul.)

     S: Sorry for your loss, but understandably so.

     10:  As a kid growing up what authors influenced you down this path to writing?


     EL: As a kid, Poe, of course, especially “Tell-Tale Heart,” “Thus I Refute Beelzy” by John Collier, and I distinctly remember being blown away in junior high by Arthur Clark’s “The Star.”


     S:  Never heard of John Collier, but you put him in great company so research time for me.

 
     11:  Are there authors today you actually enjoy reading?


     EL: Indubitably.  Most nights before bed I reread either M.R. James or Lovecraft, and I mean EVERY night.  Also, some August Derleth.  It’s always old stuff, and I don’t know why (maybe because I’M getting old!)  As for modern horror, I mainly only read stuff by friends: Ketchum, Harding, Keene.  Man, I WISH I had time to read everything that appealed to me but then I’d never get my own work done!

     S:  Sorry to hear Ketchum died, he was a great writer, Keene is another of my favs, Harding I have some and all of your collaborations.


     12:  You've mentioned that H.P. Lovecraft as one of your writing influences.  How is that?  He (Lovecraft) never really described the monsters much and you use extremely graphic detail in everything you write.


     EL: Lovecraft is the best there was, the best there is, the best there will ever be.  He never described the monsters?  Read the description of Wilbur Whateley’s body after it was mauled by the guard dog in Dunwich Horror!  Or Nahum Gardner’s wife in “Color Out of Space.”  Lovecraft, like M.R. James, was the master of reader manipulation.  There are times when it’s more effective to leave imagery to the reader’s imagination, and other times when it’s necessary to push the reader’s face and open mouth right into it.  Best example is HPL’s Case of Charles Dexter Ward.  Also James’ “Lost Hearts” with its corpse-girl in the bathtub which long pre-dates Clouzat’s 1955 flick Diabolique and King’s infamous bathtub corpse in The Shining.  Also read Lovecraft’s “Horror of Red Hook” if you can ignore the few racist paragraphs, and you’ll find it as gory, graphic, and gross as anything I’ve done.

     S:  Agreed I started reading Lovecraft, it never occurred to me about those few hints.  You mention M.R. James another person I have never heard off...….more research.


     13:  How excited were you when you heard one of your books was going to be filmed?  And when you heard it was Header, what were your thoughts?


     EL: Well, of course, I was thrilled, but even after I got paid, I didn’t think they’d actually make the movie.  I thought they were nuts.  How were they gonna raise funds for a movie about rednecks humping people’s brains?  Well, I was wrong, they were right, they did it, and it was a dynamite job.  Better than the book.

     S:  It was classic, surprised the hell out of me also it was able to be filmed, your cameo with Ketchum (RIP) was great.


     14:  You got to be an actor in Header with Jack Ketchum, was that a great influence on you making your own films?


     EL: That was a great time and a great scene, and it taught me that acting is HARD, and I’m not cut out for it.  Ketchum’s a good actor and so is the guy, Jake Suffian, who was in our scene.  They’re pros.  Me, not so much.  The reason I often put myself into my own movies is because it’s one less person I have to convey instructions to, and one last person to pay!

     S:  Good to know that's why I am doing my best to be behind the scenes lol.


     15: Are you in the process of doing more films of your own?


      EL: Oh, yes, in fact I’ve only just started, and I’m actually beginning to make some money at it–always a good thing!  After 35 years of writing, I wanted to do something different on the side, a hobby more or less.  I’d been very interested in film making when I was in junior high, and since that time the technology has changed so significantly that anyone can make movies, anyone can sell DVD’s, and anyone can release film rentals on Amazon, Vimeo, etc.  So why not?  I have BIG plans!  The biggest stumbling block, of course, is money.  It costs a fuckin’ fortune to hire nude models (I’ve hired, so far, 109 such women at $100 per hour–ouch!) And Edward Lee’s Rule #1 for horror movies is thus: There Must Be Female Nudity In A Horror Flick.  Without that element, it’s candyass BS.  A horror movie without nudity ain’t worth squat, it’s fake, it’s fussy, it’s poo-poo with a pinky in the air.   Hence, an expensive hobby!  But I’ll be doing it for a while.  My Muse makes constant demands on me!

     S: Great hobby, I own a few of your films strange and devilish.


      16:  How did they approach you with the concept of turning one of your stories, (Grubgirl) into a porn film?


      EL: Long story kind of.  In the mid-90s my friend the late Rex Miller, author of SLOB, called me up and gave me a contact address for an attorney who was looking for short horror stories to adapt into comic books.  As it turned out, the company doing the comics was Verotik, Inc., owned by Glenn Danzig.  Cool!  They bought Grub Girl and Mr. Torso, which was thrilling because I’d never had anything adapted into comics before, then they hired me to script Header and another Grub Girl–hence, I learned how to write comic scripts.  But it was actually Glenn who got the Grub Girl movie contract, and of course I was all about it.  So what if it was porn?  It’s MY character!  The movie was a hoot.  In all, my experience with Glenn Danzig and Verotik was great as well as a great privilege.

     S:  I own Grub Girl, and have been trying to get my hands on Verotik comics, but that isn't easy.


     17:  Has anyone "in the biz" ever told you that's a bad idea?


     EL: Hmm, I don’t think so, unless you count critics for Publishers’ Weekly!

     S:  Critics are the harshest but looking at your resale value is ridiculous, I will never give up my collection.


     18:  How did Dahmer's Not Dead and The Deaths of The Cold War Kings come about?  In your library of novels they seem out of place.


     EL: I had some other itches to scratch, had to try some other avenues, which was a good exercise and good experience.  But I’ll always go back to horror!

     S:  I also own those, but prefer your horror better.


     19:  What novel of yours would you like, to represent you as your best work, to see filmed without any constraints on budget, blood, or sexual?


     EL: Well, City Infernal is the most marketable, and I got multiple film options on it for years but, alas, they went the way of most options; they withered and died.  I can’t imagine a more spectacular visual event.  Operator B would make a great tv series, and years ago I had a New York agent who liked the idea, told me to write up a treatment and, well, I didn’t.  I said to hell with it.  Smart move, huh?  I simply dreaded the idea of a treatment and didn’t want to stop writing my current project, Minotauress.  In truth, ALL of my books would make great movies, if only there were companies with the balls to make them.  In the meantime, I’ll make my own movies!  I’ll show ‘em!

     S:  Well you own your property, and you know how most options and treatments go in Hollywood.  Without a trace, sad but true, I wish you all the best writing.


     20:  Your novels are the sickest most twisted sexually depraved stories I have ever encountered, I love them.  Where do the ideas dwell when you seem to become sicker and more twisted with each novel I read?


     EL: It’s either some odd idea that’s been cooking in my head a while, or some spur of the moment event where I see or hear something, then POW! the idea hits me like a fast ball in the face.  Dritiphilist was like that.  I was waiting for a No. 16 bus on 5th and Jackson in Seattle (the “bum” district).  Naturally it was raining.  Some guy just threw up in the bus shelter, so I vacated.  The vomiter staggers away, and then in rushes this guy wearing a hoodie that says KING STREET HOMELESS SHELTER on the back.  He produces a plastic bag and piece of cardboard, bends over, and scrapes the vomit into the plastic bag, then he trots guiltily away.  I just stood there, eyes wide, mouth open, chuckling, because the whole story fell into my head from witnessing that.  Wrote the story in a day or two, shaking my head the whole time, absolutely ASHAMED of myself for endeavoring to writer such a thing, but...still chuckling.  I’ll always wonder: “What did that guy do with the vomit?”

     S:  We surely know what he did with it, but life goes on.  That's very creative from your mindset, explains a lot of weird happenings.  Truth is stranger than fiction!

SHAMELESS PLUG SECTION: If I may I’d like to put you all in possession of crucial, life-changing information about my On Demand movies.  They are...

1) The ABC’s of Nude Horror: My version of The ABC’s of Death, which I didn’t think too much of.  Here is my answer.  https://vimeo.com/ondemand/theabcsofnudehorror2) The Walking Woman: a feature-length abstraction about an alien/occult influence compelling naked women to do atrocious things and bring forth its progeny of evil!  Starring 72 naked women!  (No lie!)  https://vimeo.com/ondemand/thewalkingwoman3) The Andalusian Tadpole: my tribute to the 1928 masterpiece by Salvador Dali and Luis Bunuel, The Andalusian Dog.  Now, mine’s not a masterpiece but it’s cool as shit and it’s got–will you be surprised to hear it?–lots of female nudity!  https://vimeo.com/ondemand/andalusiantadpole4) Nude In The Haunted House #1: The first of my cool new series.  A shapely woman is paid to spend the night in a haunted house, but there’s a catch: she must be naked!  Then she discovers that there’s ANOTHER catch...  This short movie stars co-stars none other than Edward Lee (but, don’t worry, I’m NOT naked in it)! https://vimeo.com/ondemand/nudeinthehauntedhouse


    I wish to thank Edward Lee for his time and patience on this project of mine, he is still my favorite writer.  I am hopeful this does his legacy justice.  And a special shout-out to D. Barnett for giving me this opportunity with my legend.
     It's been awhile but regularity is coming very soon.  But anyhow I've been hard at work filming and helping help independent filmmakers get some work done.  But without further ado I will be having a new logo and some big things coming. Stay tuned.

Thanks Steve

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

     This is long overdue but I feel women should have more than one month to celebrated for their accomplishments in the horror genre, and of course the Soska's blood drive should never be overlooked.  We all need to donate more often cause someone is always in need of blood, again I state that women and blood shouldn't be an afterthought, there is always need.


It's that magical time of year again where we Sisters Soska don't just want to spill blood on the screen, but want YOU to bleed for us.

Don't worry, it's for an incredibly good cause.

Now in it's 9th EPIC year, February marks the start of another Women In Horror Month meant to promote equality and celebrate the great artists both working today and the trail blazers who've come before.
As we all know women are quite capable and we're not asking for a hand out. Just some support. We've even taken it upon ourselves to be the ones giving back. You can't think horror without thinking blood and we've long wondered why the horror genre hasn't already thrown its weight behind the blood donation cause. So we did it.
As part of WiHM, each year we search out filmmakers from across the globe to make their own Public Service Announcements for Blood Services and Red Cross. The only requirements are that you have to be passionate about the cause and you must be a feminist. I'm proud to say that this year we have a record setting 30 TEAMS that have participated. Magnificently each PSA was made with the filmmakers using their own money and resources along with generous donations and numerous volunteers.

We have a different themes each year and this year is BE A HERO.

In previous years, we've combined them all into one mega anthology, but this year we're making it our BIGGEST year yet. EVERY day in February (starting January 31st and ending March 1st) we will be releasing a NEW PSA via our Twisted Twins YouTube Channel (https://www.youtube.com/user/twistedtwinsstudios). Please subscribe.
We are very proud to announce our outstanding list of contributors for our 2018 WiHM Massive Blood Drive:

Hannah Neurotica (WiHM Founder), Lex Lybrand, Paddy Murphy, Tonja Atmoic & Mi Chelle Nessk, Mary Rangel, Atropa Films, Maude Michaud, Tommy Pistol, Ama Lea, Damon Rickard, Adam Marcus, Stitch Mays, Marilyn Thomas, Joe Magna, Jamie DeWolf, Vanessa Wright, Nicholas Burman-Vince, Christian Francis & Mark Miller, Izzy Lee, Aleah Anseth, Sam Hawkins & Kim Pipkin, Andrew Hass, Dayna Noffke, Vicky Tori Ella, Aishlinn Clarke, Stephanie Michelle, Brandon Slagle, Michelle Romano, Angela Nolan, and us, the Soska Sisters.

Each day we'll release profiles on the filmmakers along with their shorts and sometimes even poster art and BTS stills. As a special added surprise, you won't know which one is being released when, so keep your eyes on the prize!
Thank you so much for watching, but PLEASE be sure to make an appointment to donate. We need you. After all, it's in you to give.
Jen and Sylv

  3 Attached Images
It's Women in Horror Month and that brings with it not only numerous celebrations of equality, but our MASSIVE Blood Drive! Yes, you can't think horror without thinking blood so we took upon ourselves to make the world aware of the very dire need for donors. Now in it's 9th year, we decided to kick things up a notch by featuring 30 filmmaking teams from around the world and release a new Blood Services PSA for 30 days!


DISCLAIMER: This IS Horror, boys and grrls, so SOME of these do have VERY naughty content. Blood. Gore. EXTREME gore. Disturbing situations. Nudity. Sexual situations. Violence. Language.

If you are SENSITIVE to this kind of content, be a mature human being and just don't watch. No need to spoil the fun for us fellow weirdos. We're not hurting anyone. It just REALLY looks like we are ;)


Now, on with the show!!
Presenting: "Be A Hero" by Vanessa Ionta Wright

Check it out here: https://youtu.be/6bvYMvulwEo



ABOUT THE ARTIST:

Vanessa Ionta Wright is a filmmaker based in Atlanta, GA. She is the co-owner of Above the Line Artistry (www.abovethelineartistry.com) as well as the co-founder and Festival Director of the Women in Horror Film Festival (www.WIHFF.com).  Vanessa collaborated with Samantha Kolesnik, Mark Simon (One Missed Call), David Irwin (House of 1000 Corpses) and Josh Oliver (Oculus) on Rainy Season, based on the story by Stephen King.  Vanessa has also directed the short film I Baked Him a Cake and a PSA for the WiHM9 Massive Blood Drive.  Vanessa graduated from Ohio University with a degree in Video Production & Film. She is a lifelong fan of cinema, most especially the horror genre. She enjoys punctuality, scary movies, a quick wit, sandwiches, the music of Michael Jackson, Halloween & Bacon Jam. She does not enjoy bugs, clowns, perpetual lateness, mean people, oppression, laziness, running more than 3 miles or curved walls.


ARTIST'S STATEMENT:

I was really honored to be invited to create a PSA for the WiHM Massive Blood Drive.  This is a brilliant idea to blend the world of horror filmmaking with such an important cause.  I think it's easy to take our blood for granted.  It is crucial to donate.  I hear people say all the time "I wish I could do something to help" and this is probably the most simple and effective means of helping others.  Giving your blood will save lives and I am so grateful to be a part of such an amazing cause.  The theme this year of Be a Hero is so appropriate, because when you give blood, when you save a life, you become a hero.  



Cast of Be a Hero:

Belator - Dani Detteè
Element - Jeremy Sande
Agent Orange - Tyler J. Shaw
The Sting - Brian Ashton Smith
Lightning Storm - Adam Dann
Eclipse - Jaxon Duron

Crew of Be a Hero:

Writer/Director - Vanessa Ionta Wright
Producer/1st AD - Lynne Hansen
Producer - Kathy Chambless Oliver
DP - Mark Simon
Score - Ross Childress
Production Designer - Maryelle St. Clare
Special Makeup Effects - Cass McClure
Special Makeup Effects - Christine Ramirez
Special Makeup Effects - Nadine Al-Remaizan
Hair Stylist - Brittany Patterson
Makeup Artist - Katherine (Tyler) Roetzer
Set Dresser - Natalie Ballard
Set Dresser - Sascha Suresky
Set Dresser - Jason Thompson
Sound Recordist - Stacia Rayon
Boom Operator - Edgar Rincon
Script Supervisor - Susan Boone
1st AC - Molly Roland
2nd AC - Feliccina Flores
Camera Assistant - Deidra Tyree Smith
Gaffer - Josh Oliver
Grip - Beanz Ramirez
Wardrobe - Anissa Matlock
Wardrobe - Kit Vinsick
Art Consultant - Dayna Noffke
Sound Design - Leah Puffenberger
Editor - Vanessa Wright
Colorist - Peter Mattson


Look for a NEW WiHM Massive Blood Drive PSA every day with the last one appearing on March 1st.
For more on Women In Horror Month check out the official site at: http://www.womeninhorrormonth.com/

  1 Attached Images

It's time to unleash that latest offering for our Women In Horror Month MASSIVE Blood Drive! This year we have a killer 30 filmmaking teams who have come together to bring awareness to blood donation. And a NEW PSA being released every single day!

DISCLAIMER: This IS Horror, boys and grrls, so SOME of these do have VERY naughty content. Blood. Gore. EXTREME gore. Disturbing situations. Nudity. Sexual situations. Violence. Language.

If you are SENSITIVE to this kind of content, be a mature human being and just don't watch. No need to spoil the fun for us fellow weirdos. We're not hurting anyone. It just REALLY looks like we are ;)

Here's our next: "Sanguino" by Dayna Noffke
Link here: https://youtu.be/YkGQtcWOqtQ


Sanguino Credits
Written by Anthony Taylor (http://taylorcosm.com)Directed by Dayna Noffke (http://www.daynanoffke.com)
Starring:

Madeline Brumby (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm3906344/)
Viva Tolar (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm6185413/?ref_=nv_sr_1)
Joe Hart
Director of Cinematography:Bryan Redding (http://www.bryanredding.com)Gaffer: Chase YarbroughProduction Designer: Jessica Britton ParkerDigital FX Supervisor: Stacey Palmer1st AD: Gabriela McNicollOn Set Dresser: Derek HaygoodKey Beauty Makeup Artist: Beverly Ever Hegmon (http://www.everaftermakeupartistry.com)Key SFX Makeup Artist: Luke Godfrey (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm4918272/)Script Supervisor: Nahika BlanchetCamera PA: Scott MitchellSet PA: Gilbert MorenoEditor: Stacey PalmerColorist: John Petersen (https://www.moonshinepost.com/about/)Sound Design: Krista BeruttiMusic Composer: Benjamin S. Hernandez and Paul NassarRe-Recording Engineer: Benjamin S. Hernandez
Special Thanks to:
Shane Morton of Silver Scream FX Lab (http://www.silverscreamfxlab.com)
Jen and Sylvia Soska
Lynne Hansen
Chris Ethridge

DIRECTOR’S BIO

Dayna Noffke is a screenwriter and director, who has brought her unique brand of storytelling,
dark humor, fangirl-infused enthusiasm and obsessive work ethic to Atlanta, Georgia.

Her work in the horror genre is informed by her experiences and her lifelong love of film. Her
travels have taken her from a childhood in St. Louis to stints in New York, Boston, New Orleans and even Branson, Missouri. Along the way, she picked up a degree in physical anthropology/primatology, logged time on a research project on mantled howler monkeys in Ometepe, Nicaragua, spent a few years as a high school special education teacher, and earned herself a roller derby name.

Dayna fell into filmmaking after a chance encounter brought her to the set of Rob Zombie’s
Halloween 2. Within two months, she had written and directed her first short film with a cast and crew full of friends, including Andrew Shearer of Gonzoriffic films. She had caught the bug and directed 9 more short films between 2009 and 2017.

Her film catalog runs the gamut from “backyard” no budget fare - such as the well-received 2011 film, MOUSE, praised for its naturalistic acting - to recent projects such as late 2017’s Teaser, a lush burlesque-inspired period piece that is hitting the festival circuit in 2018.

Dayna’s films have been screened at numerous festivals including Women in Horror events,
Rome International Film Festival, Spooky Empire’s Film Festival, Buried Alive, VHS, Florida
Film Festival among many others. Her screenplays have been chosen as official selections and finalists in screenplay competitions and showcases such as Oaxaca Film Festival, Stranger With My Face and Filmquest.

Dayna is currently in development for a horror feature inspired by a classic Victorian short horror story, along with working on new short films and logging lots of time traveling with her family, visiting historical and haunted sites, riding roller coasters and forging friendships all along the way.
Website: www.daynanoffke.com
Twitter: @daynadirector
Instagram: @thrillridepictures
And her daughter, Viva Noffke, the LITTLEST Monster Maker's Instagram is: @littlestmonstermaker. Not only a talented young actor, but a KILLER FX artist!



ARTIST STATEMENT

"I am grateful for the opportunity to be a part of this year’s Blood Drive campaign for several
reasons. One of my favorite things about filmmaking is the collaborative nature of the art. I love meeting people, working with other amazing talents and bringing it all together to create
something bigger than anyone of us. This project encouraged me to stretch my artistic
imagination and to reach out to new people to help realize this vision, which is unlike any other
project I have undertaken to this point in my career.

I love that there are 30 PSAs being released — that we are a part of something much bigger.
This is a wonderful chance to meet new artists and to see and support their work.

Of course, most importantly, our entire team is thrilled to be supporting the cause of blood
donation. I have personally been the recipient of blood transfusions at three different points in
my life. I do not know what would have happened had that blood not been available when I
needed it. I want to express my gratitude to blood donors and to put a face to this cause.

When you give blood, you are helping a real person - someone’s mother, someone’s sister or brother or baby... Although the need for donated blood can be greater during times of disaster, there are people who are counting on transfusions each and every day. We are honored to help spread the word and remind everyone how important it is to donate blood!"















We're back with a brand new PSA for Blood Services for our Women In Horror Month MASSIVE Blood Drive. We are honored to have a record breaking 30 filmmaking teams come together this year to contribute. So much so that we've given them each their own day.
Onto the next one! Not for the faint of heart....


DISCLAIMER: This IS Horror, boys and grrls, so SOME of these do have VERY naughty content. Blood. Gore. EXTREME gore. Disturbing situations. Nudity. Sexual situations. Violence. Language.

If you are SENSITIVE to this kind of content, be a mature human being and just don't watch. No need to spoil the fun for us fellow weirdos. We're not hurting anyone. It just REALLY looks like we are ;)



There are very few people as kind as these creative artists. Then, if you read their work, you are utterly horrified by its darkness. The very best know how to stay in the light but play in the dark.  

I am very honored that Mark Miller & Christian Francis were kind enough to lend their talents to this year's Women in Horror Month Massive Blood Drive, I am privileged to call them friends, and I am giddily elated at the sights they have to show you.


AT MIDNIGHT TONIGHT - THE LATEST BLOOD DRIVE PSA WILL GO LIVE.

DISCLAIMER: This IS Horror, boys and grrls, so SOME of these do have VERY naughty content. Blood. Gore. EXTREME gore. Disturbing situations. Nudity. Sexual situations. Violence. Language.

If you are SENSITIVE to this kind of content, be a mature human being and just don't watch. No need to spoil the fun for us fellow weirdos. We're not hurting anyone. It just REALLY looks like we are ;)

"The Coming Dawn Ministry" by Mark Miller & Christian Francis




ABOUT THE ARTISTS:


Mark Alan Miller
Mark has been working as a writer since 2005 when he started as a columnist for OCWeekly. Since then has edited two major novels (The Scarlet Gospels & Abarat: Absolute Midnight by Clive Barker) Released two novels of his own: Hellriaser: The Toll and Next Testament. Written countless comics, including Heavy Metal Magazine, Next Testament, Hellraiser & Hellraiser Bestiary (BOOM! Comics), Hellraiser: Anthology (Seraphim Comics), and The Steam Man (Dark Horse).
Mark's work as a producer includes animated shorts with the comedy troupe Superego for Nerdist Channel, as well as Stan Lee’s Lucky Man: The Bracelet Chronicles (Which he was also a writer for), and Nightbreed: The Directors Cut.

He has previously directed segments for Fun Sized Horror 2 and Virus of the Dead, as well as promotional trailers for Abarat: Absolute Midnight and The Sickness.

Christian Francis
Christian is a writer and designer whose work has appeared across multiple mediums… Well… that’s what he thinks. He’s probably wrong. Everyone is most likely lying to him, and creating fake websites and orchestrating far too elaborate practical jokes to make it look like his work is out there.
He also really, really hates mushrooms and has a weird obsession with hand puppets.
Being a good bio, I asked Christian what else he wanted to include here. He told me to ensure that everyone knows that the camera does indeed add 10lbs… Sometimes 20lbs… And as well as this, it also makes you a really bad actor. 


ARTISTS' STATEMENT:

"The Soska Sisters are leading a charge for change. The Women in Horror Blood Drive is a lot more than just getting people to donate blood (which in itself is enough reason to take part) but they are also raising awareness and promoting equality, not only for women within the horror industry, but providing a voice for unknown filmmakers. This Blood Drive is about community, and expanding that community for the good of the industry – the fact it will may also save lives by getting people to donate blood? Well… the questions should be, how could we say no? #wearewiththesoskas"


We're back with a brand new PSA for Blood Services for our Women In Horror Month MASSIVE Blood Drive. We are honored to have a record breaking 30 filmmaking teams come together this year to contribute. So much so that we've given them each their own day.
Onto the next one! Not for the faint of heart....


DISCLAIMER: This IS Horror, boys and grrls, so SOME of these do have VERY naughty content. Blood. Gore. EXTREME gore. Disturbing situations. Nudity. Sexual situations. Violence. Language.

If you are SENSITIVE to this kind of content, be a mature human being and just don't watch. No need to spoil the fun for us fellow weirdos. We're not hurting anyone. It just REALLY looks like we are ;)



There are very few people as kind as these creative artists. Then, if you read their work, you are utterly horrified by its darkness. The very best know how to stay in the light but play in the dark.  

I am very honored that Mark Miller & Christian Francis were kind enough to lend their talents to this year's Women in Horror Month Massive Blood Drive, I am privileged to call them friends, and I am giddily elated at the sights they have to show you.


AT MIDNIGHT TONIGHT - THE LATEST BLOOD DRIVE PSA WILL GO LIVE.

DISCLAIMER: This IS Horror, boys and grrls, so SOME of these do have VERY naughty content. Blood. Gore. EXTREME gore. Disturbing situations. Nudity. Sexual situations. Violence. Language.

If you are SENSITIVE to this kind of content, be a mature human being and just don't watch. No need to spoil the fun for us fellow weirdos. We're not hurting anyone. It just REALLY looks like we are ;)

"The Coming Dawn Ministry" by Mark Miller & Christian Francis




ABOUT THE ARTISTS:


Mark Alan Miller
Mark has been working as a writer since 2005 when he started as a columnist for OCWeekly. Since then has edited two major novels (The Scarlet Gospels & Abarat: Absolute Midnight by Clive Barker) Released two novels of his own: Hellriaser: The Toll and Next Testament. Written countless comics, including Heavy Metal Magazine, Next Testament, Hellraiser & Hellraiser Bestiary (BOOM! Comics), Hellraiser: Anthology (Seraphim Comics), and The Steam Man (Dark Horse).
Mark's work as a producer includes animated shorts with the comedy troupe Superego for Nerdist Channel, as well as Stan Lee’s Lucky Man: The Bracelet Chronicles (Which he was also a writer for), and Nightbreed: The Directors Cut.

He has previously directed segments for Fun Sized Horror 2 and Virus of the Dead, as well as promotional trailers for Abarat: Absolute Midnight and The Sickness.

Christian Francis
Christian is a writer and designer whose work has appeared across multiple mediums… Well… that’s what he thinks. He’s probably wrong. Everyone is most likely lying to him, and creating fake websites and orchestrating far too elaborate practical jokes to make it look like his work is out there.
He also really, really hates mushrooms and has a weird obsession with hand puppets.
Being a good bio, I asked Christian what else he wanted to include here. He told me to ensure that everyone knows that the camera does indeed add 10lbs… Sometimes 20lbs… And as well as this, it also makes you a really bad actor. 


ARTISTS' STATEMENT:

"The Soska Sisters are leading a charge for change. The Women in Horror Blood Drive is a lot more than just getting people to donate blood (which in itself is enough reason to take part) but they are also raising awareness and promoting equality, not only for women within the horror industry, but providing a voice for unknown filmmakers. This Blood Drive is about community, and expanding that community for the good of the industry – the fact it will may also save lives by getting people to donate blood? Well… the questions should be, how could we say no? #wearewiththesoskas